bfi screenonline mining review the s s

INQUIRY

When we get your inquiries, we will send tailored catalogue, pricelist, delivery, payment terms and other required details to you by email within 24 hours.

bfi screenonline mining review the s s

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review (1947-83)

Monthly film magazine for the coal industry and mining communities. It was common for companies, such as Shell and British Transport Film, to produce industrial cine-magazines, and one of the earliest and long-lasting productions for the National Coal Board was Mining Review.Taking its cue from the popular cine-magazines of the 1930s and '40s, such as Pathé Pictorial and Eve's Film Reviews

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review 1/1: The Miner's Song (1947)

Mining Review 1/1: The Miner's Song (1947) BFI : Mining Review 1st Year No. 1: The Miner's Song: September 1947 : 35mm, black and white, 3 mins : Production Company: Crown Film Unit: Sponsor: National Coal Board: Producer: John Taylor: Presenter: Carroll Levis: Show full cast and credits. Carroll Levis introduces 'The Miner's Song', performed by James Ovington and arranged and conducted by

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review: The 1960s/1970s

The last Mining Review as such was 25th Year No. 12, the 300th of the series. Patrick Russell. Related Films and TV programmes. Related Collections. Mining Review (1947-83) Monthly film magazine for the coal industry and mining communities. Mining Review: 13th Year (1959-60) The thirteenth year of the coal industry's own newsreel. Mining Review: 14th Year (1960-61) The fourteenth year of the

Bfi Screenonline Mining Review The S S

Bfi Screenonline Mining Review 11 Five Day Week 1947. Sitting down for a pint after work a group of miners debate the merits of a fiveday working week britains mines were nationalised on 1 january 1947 though it quickly became apparent that this made no appreciable difference to the working conditions of the ordinary miner as a result there were . Read the rest > Bfi Screenonline Mining Review

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review: 5th Year (1951-52)

The National Coal Board's annual report, and the sixtieth Jubilee issue of Mining Review, covering 1947-1952. Michael Brooke, with data from the BFI SIFT database. Related Films and TV programmes. Related Collections. Mining Review (1947-83) Monthly film magazine for the coal industry and mining communities . Mining Review: The 1940s/1950s: The first thirteen years of the coal industry's own

bfi screenonline mining review the s s

Bfi Screenonline Mining Review 111 The Row Between The. Come All Ye Bold Miners 1952s great anthology of coalfield ballads concluded with Armstrongs The Row Between the Cages justly implying that this was as good as mining songs could get The tale of two fightable colliers who dont always play by Queensberry Rules has the lot demotic language humour an affectionate humanity an . Learn More

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review 20/10: Out of the Past

BFI : Mining Review 20th Year No. 10: North East Out of the Past: 35mm, black and white, 2 mins : Production Company: National Coal Board Film Unit: Sponsor: National Coal Board: Show full cast and credits . The work of amateur historian John Barton, and Durham's Bowes Museum, in preserving the artefacts of the past. Show full synopsis. This nostalgic Mining Review item explores the

BFI Screenonline: Mining Review: 19th Year (1965-66)

Mining Review: 19th Year (1965-66) The nineteenth year of the coal industry's own newsreel . This is a complete list of items screened during Mining Review's 19th year: September 1965 No. 1. Guys and Dolls Lancashire Miner's Gala complete with beauty queens and wrestlers. Push Button A colliery self-service canteen in operation. Miners at Sea Yorkshire miners who are also sea fishermen

Archive resources online | BFI

We share the BFI’s knowledge of British film and television through these online services. BFI Screenonline. Our online encyclopaedia of British film and television featuring hundreds of hours of film and television clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive. BFI InView . A collection of non-fiction film and television for academics and further/higher education students of

Search BFI Player

© 2020 British Film Institute. All rights reserved. Registered charity 287780

bfi screenonline mining review the s s

Bfi Screenonline Mining Review 111 The Row Between The. Come All Ye Bold Miners 1952s great anthology of coalfield ballads concluded with Armstrongs The Row Between the Cages justly implying that this was as good as mining songs could get The tale of two fightable colliers who dont always play by Queensberry Rules has the lot demotic language humour an affectionate humanity an . Learn More

If you enjoyed When Coal Was King| BFI

Resources you should know about include: an extensive collection of articles on BFI Screenonline; material in the BFI’s Mediatheques; and, for total immersion in the movies themselves, a hefty DVD box-set. Mining Review 1st Year No. 11 (1948) When discussing these films, it’s awfully hard to avoid coalmining metaphors: one of the great things about this collection is that it’s so simple

Howards End archive review: a troubling Homepage | BFI

With only The Longest Journey left to film, Howards End is a sign that the Forster screen adaptation machine is finally grinding to a halt. Written in 1910 and considered to be the author's finest work, the novel's portrayal of moral decay and unscrupulousness in an English society shaken by economic and social change is particularly appropriate in the grey light of the present depression. Set

Mining Review 1st Year · British Universities Film & Video

From 15th Year Number 1, September 1961, the National Coal Board’s own Film Unit produced the series until its demise in 1983. All issues of Mining Review were distributed to cinemas on 35mm (by National Screen Services until 1955, and after by DATA Distribution). They were also available from the NCB Film Library on 16mm for public and

Watch Miner online BFI Player

Paralleling the division between technology and social stories in Mining Review, it's divided into three rather unequal parts. The first and longest, taking us through a 'typical' miner's shift underground at Hilton Main colliery, Staffordshire, works well as a self-contained documentary and a primer on the technological state of play in 1950 (still early days in the NCB's mechanisation

National Coal Board | BFI

The last of the Review series (formerly Mining Review), Review 36th Year No. 5, was released in March 1983, and on April 1984 the NCB Film Unit closed. This article originally appeared on BFI Screenonline

Archive resources online | BFI

We share the BFI’s knowledge of British film and television through these online services. BFI Screenonline. Our online encyclopaedia of British film and television featuring hundreds of hours of film and television clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive. BFI InView . A collection of non-fiction film and television for academics and further/higher education students of

Crown Film Unit | BFI

The Unit’s films of the time also presage the documentary industry’s own future development. For instance, in 1947 Crown produced the first six issues of Mining Review for the recently created National Coal Board, before the series was outsourced to the independent unit Data. Talented (though mostly overlooked) new filmmakers also emerged in Crown’s later output. Margaret Thomson made

Coal Face (1935) | BFI

It’s the sound added to these silent images that makes the film truly special. With its drummed rhythms, discordant piano notes, individual and massed voices, Welsh choirs and more, it’s no wonder that the film has been described as ‘an oratorio of coal mining’. Like a musical piece, it is divided into distinct ‘movements’ each one (particularly a sequence taking us ‘underground

Search BFI Player

© 2020 British Film Institute. All rights reserved. Registered charity 287780

Watch Mining Review 6th Year No. 1 online BFI Player

This edition of Mining Review from January 1952 covers the inauguration of a new shaft in Nottinghamshire, a 'free week' at Pwllheli Butlins in Wales and a golfing break from work. There's also a visit to Southall Studios where actor John Gregson shoots a scene from The Brave Don't Cry, a dramatic recreation of a recent mining disaster. A

Watch Mining Review 23rd Year No. 1 online BFI Player

In this eclectic edition of industrial cinemagazine Mining Review, Liverpudlians marvel at the futuristic spherical dwelling 'Futuro', one of the main attractions of the 1969 Liverpool Show. Meanwhile in Chalfont St. Giles, Buckinghamshire, Pauline Ann Lake's physical attributes secure her first

Watch Mining Review 1st Year No. 7 online BFI Player

It's coal on ice! This March 1948 edition of Mining Review, the coal industry's monthly cinemagazine, has a wintry feel. As well as a story on emergency measures to keep the nation's fuel supplies moving during freezing weather, it includes a feature on Dunfermline miner Tom Syme, an Olympic ice-hockey hopeful in training at his local skating rink before heading for St Moritz.

The BFI celebrates a century of British coalmining on

07/07/2009· The BFI’s website will also be used to extend engagement with this project, including a feature on the home page and extensive additional resources in our dedicated online education zone, BFI Screenonline, which is accessed for free by millions of schoolchildren and students across the UK every year. BFI members will receive a free film download from the King Coal collection.

The Happiest Days of Your Life (film) Wikipedia

The Happiest Days of Your Life is a 1950 British comedy film directed by Frank Launder, based on the 1947 play of the same name by John Dighton. The two men also wrote the screenplay. It is one of a stable of classic British film comedies produced by Frank Launder and Sidney Gilliat for British Lion Film Corporation.The film was made on location in Liss and at Riverside Studios, London.

Michael Brooke | BFI

Michael Brooke is a freelance writer specialising in British and central/eastern European cinema. A regular contributor to Sight & Sound magazine, he spent nearly a decade at the BFI (2002-11), where he helped create BFI Screenonline and BFI InView, produced the BFI’s internationally acclaimed DVD compilations of short films by the Quay Brothers and Jan Švankmajer and co-produced the Blu

Watch Mining Review 2nd Year No. 4 online BFI Player

When this was shot, Mining Review was in its second year, and had a regular team in place with Donald Alexander producing it for Data Film Productions. This government film is a public record, preserved and presented by the BFI National Archive on behalf of The National Archives, home to more than 1,000 years of British history.

BFI Screenonline (Open Access) The Courtauld Institute

ReView (AHR net) Underground and Independent Comics, Comix and Graphic Novels (ProQuest) Vogue Archive (ProQuest) Vogue Italia Archive (ProQuest) Women’s Magazine Archive (ProQuest) Women’s Wear Daily (ProQuest) ProQuest Resources; Oxford Reference Online; Periodicals Archive Online (ProQuest, via JISC) BFI Screenonline (Open Access) CLICK HERE . BFI Screenonline features

It's a Great Day Wikipedia

It's a Great Day is a 1955 British comedy film directed by John Warrington. A spin-off of the popular soap The Grove Family, the film stars Ruth Dunning as Gladys Grove, Edward Evans as Bob Grove, and Sid James as Harry Mason. Plot summary. A builder has problems with his local council in getting supplies vital to complete his housing estate. He turns to local criminals to provide the service

Coal on Film Greatest global cinema on BFI Player

Mining Review 23rd Year No. 6 Mining Review 23rd Year No. 6. Cinemagazine 1970 11 mins Location: Caldey Island/Ynys Byr Ace edition of the series with wintry-but-warm vignettes of coal community life in South Hetton, Woolley Colliery and Caldey Island. Watch for free Thorncliffe Thorncliffe. Documentary 1935 27 mins Location: Chapeltown A look at Thorncliffe's extensive industrial heritage